The Allerton Hotel

As many of you know I am simply enamoured by the history of the various hotels that once graced Cleveland – The Hollenden, The Statler, The Winton. Another hotel that gets very little attention is the Allerton Hotel (or I should say the Allerton Apartments, now) located on the corner of E. 13th and Chester. The Allerton Hotel is a stunning building built in 1926 by the Allerton Company of New York. The architects were the Morgantroyd and Ogden Company. The Allerton Company owned at one time eight hotels including hotels in Detroit and Chicago (the Chicago Allerton still operates as hotel along the Magnificent Mile on Michigan Avenue). No doubt the building today is a bit rough – it offers low-income housing. Recently the building went through some modest redevelopment. But back in the day it was a stunning structure. Check this photo out!

This photo provided courtesy of Cleveland Press Archives.

This photo makes the Allerton look like one hell of a time. The hotel offered 550 rooms, an air-conditioned dining room, a coffee shop, a famous cocktail lounge and a swimming pool. I know I could had have a few good evenings at the Allerton.

This photo provided courtesy of Cleveland Press Archives.

Cool stuff. And dig this postcard!

This photo provided courtesy of the Cleveland Press Archives.

 

Wow! What a beautiful place. I can only dream of spending a night in this very cool and hip hotel. Those days are past, my friends. It is a shame the condition the building is today, but once upon a time it really was a place for royalty.

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The Bond Store

Photo provided courtesy of the Cleveland Press Archives.

Is the building above not the coolest thing you have ever seen? Do you know where this building used to be in Downtown Cleveland? It was one of the last art moderne buildings to reside in the City – it is the home of the Bond Clothing Company. And it was located on the northwest corner of East Ninth and Euclid Avenue (think National City Tower today). The Bond Clothing Company was started in the Hickcox Building on the same corner in the 1920′s. Charles Bond founded the firm and it quickly became the largest retail chain for men’s clothing in the United States and was well known for its two piece suit collection for men. Anyway, the Bond Company decided to tear down the Hickox building in 1946 and erected this beautiful monument soon thereafter.

Photo provided courtesy of the Cleveland Press Archives.

Many stories have been told about the majestic interior including an open terrace and illuminated mirrored columns that extended from the first floor up to the third floor. There was a large curved staircase that allowed patrons to casually walk through the department store and get a great feel about all four floors and the merchandise offered to patrons. I believe that Walker & Weeks was the architect of record.

Photo provided courtesy of the Cleveland Press Archives.

The above photo offers a great view from East Ninth looking west down Euclid Avenue towards Public Square. I love how this street used to look. Unfortunately, the store was torn down in 1978 to make way for the National City Tower. This is brilliant architecture. Seems a shame to have lost this to a bland commercial tower.

 

Photo provided courtesy of the Cleveland Press Archives.